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Kristin Martin

Kristin Martin

You wouldn’t know it by the strength of her British accent, but Rosie has been in the US for over 10 years. She arrived in Indianapolis to run track and cross country at Butler University. Since then she has progressed through the distances, from 1500 meters to the marathon.rosie_bio3

Rosie is fresh of the plane from her most recent race at the British Olympic Marathon Trials, where she placed third with a time of 2:31. Wowza! She loves all things science-based and enjoys putting her Sports Science Degree and running experience into practice.

 In addition to her coaching on Runcoach, she is a strength and mobility coach and today we asked her to share a few little tips, which may help in your next race build-up:

 Hips don’t lie~

Hip mobility is a huge focus area for runners, whether you are in a car, seated at a desk or watching TV at night, sitting with your knees and hips at 90 degrees can be a little tough on the body.

As runners, hip extension is paramount when opening the stride. However, the everyday seated position can lead to tight and shortened hip flexors which can decrease the length of our stride, costing us precious seconds over each mile and even leading to injuries.

 If you have the ability to sit on an exercise ball rather than a chair it will help to keep your hips mobile throughout the day, while activating and recruiting stabilizing core muscles.

Here are some of her favorite hip-opening stretches.
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Another key area that we often neglect are the adductors. If we asked you to log how many steps we take in the forward motion compared to the lateral motion each day we'd wager that the majority of us only build in lateral movement when turning very tight corners.

 This is why our adductors can become weak and as a result, tight.

By adding a little focused work to strengthen these stabilizing muscles we can once again work towards decreasing injury risk.

Strength exercises for this exercise include clamshells, monster walks, and lateral steps with resistance bands.

One of her favorite stretches can be viewed below. The mountain backdrop certainly makes the stretch more enjoyable.

Hold each stretch for 1-2 minutes or move gently in and out of the stretch for mobility, avoid aggressively bouncing.

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Taking a few minutes each day to focus on the little things can pay dividends in the long run, no pun intended. Happy running.

When should I change my running shoes?

This is one of the most common questions among runners of all levels. The condition and life within your shoes have a huge impact on your body, and quality of your training sessions.

Below is an exchange between Coach Hiruni and Runcoach Athlete and avid endurance runner Andrei Marinus.

Andrei: I run over 200km (125 miles) per month, and a good pair of shoes (even on sale is easily over 100USD). So here’s the million-dollar question… When do I have to change them again?

Coach Hiruni: Excellent question. Most folks who take running seriously search for an answer to this question. There are general guidelines some shoe manufacturers have (400-600km or 250 – 400 miles) for wear and tear, but not everyone wears shoes the same way.

Andrei: Yes, I noticed very few of them mention a higher mileage. It could be the shoe company tries to sell as much as they can. But I also understand the reasoning - after a certain mileage, the shoe loses its advertised features, and stop protecting the runner.

Coach Hiruni: As a coach I am also reluctant to recommend running high mileage in one shoe, because I have the best interest of my runners at heart. I want you and my other runners to be protected when you leave your door for a run, and continue to stack up days, weeks, months of consistent training. There are aspects on your shoe and within your legs you can use as a guide to know it is time to upgrade your footwear.

Andrei: So it seems, the best judge should be the runner? I should listen to my body. Once I start to receive signs of pain or discomfort or simply just not the same bounce as before, it is a signal.  Though pain is universal, everyone experiences it differently. For me it is usually a bit of tightness in the ligaments around the ankle. I have ignored this in the past, telling myself that some Kenyan runners are doing marathons on bare feet, so if I keep running in worn out shoes, I would still be protected. How I wished I didn’t do that … I ended up at an orthopedist who promptly put me offline for two months. Imagine how I felt going from over 200km to zero … Let’s just say I had learned my lesson, and ever since I am really listening to my body.

Coach Hiruni: Agreed. Some of the best lessons are learned the hard way. Most people can also tell by simply looking at the bottom of the sole of the shoe. The tread (just like a tire) should look fresh. If you notice pieces missing, or the shoe just looks “old and tired” that’s a red flag! For some people this can happen as early as 200km (125-150 miles) into wearing a shoe.

Andrei: Right on that point. Look at the sole of the shoes that I ran in when I got my marathon PB and my first ultra-marathon. They will be always close to my heart, but I know they have to go. There is almost nothing left at the back the shoe, right where I land.

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I am running in zero drops, you can imagine with no sole left at the heel, I kind of converted them into negative drops…

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Written by Runcoach Marketing Expert Kristin Martin.

You wanna know how my race schedule was in 2020? Nada. Zip. Zero.

I originally planned on Fall 2020  "post-baby 70.3 vacation in Mexico" and perhaps even chase a PR half marathon. But like many of you, the conditions – cancellations, pool closures, personal COVID protocols, etc – led me to decide in June that I wouldn’t be able to formally in-person race till 2021. So, did I do a virtual half marathon to prove myself? ...I’d like to say that I did (I wish I had!) but with the poor air quality in Denver last fall and some lingering calf issues, I bailed on that too.


2021 is a new year, and with the continued slow start to events (or the deferment of many races), it’s easy to keep the calendar free of racing commitments till later this year. However, by following the simple steps below, you, like me, can stop with the excuses and be successful at a virtual race this Spring.


  1. PUT IT ON THE CALENDAR (and commit!) - Looking back, this was probably my number one  mistake. When I decided to not participate in the triathlon, I mentally changed my goal to general fitness and cleared my calendar of running obligations. My running became more haphazard. While it's fun to run when the spirit moved me, my runs weren’t focused or structured in a way that built up to feeling comfortable in completing a race of that distance. By putting it a goal on the calendar and telling your partner, friend, or Coach, you increase your commitment to your race goal. This doesn’t mean that if you wake up and it’s a downpour or an extreme heatwave you can’t tweak your race date, but it helps to make sure you stay accountable and schedule or reschedule it for the best date.


  1. PICK A (safe) COURSE YOU LOVE - We can all picture races we love for their scenery, elevation profile (up or down!), or running surface. You have the power to plot out the course that fits you best. You can also stock your course with your favorite fueling gels or drinks. Will you run along a nearby stream? Around that favorite park in a loop? The possibilities are endless to construct your new favorite race map.


Safety tip: Check out your race course or train on it to know how crowded it will be (wear your mask) and make sure to follow appropriate traffic signals and other signage. Give your map to your family or friends so they know where you’ll be -- and can even cheer for you!


  1. TALK TO YOUR COACH - Even your trusted is experiencing the same adversities as you. Having to work thrrough similiar things mean first hand experience and great tips on how to adjust an outlook when you might not be feeling it or your schedule if your plans change. Maybe you want to switch to a 5K instead of a 10K, or you want to run/walk your first half. Take advantage of the flexibility that virtual racing offers with the expertise of coaches who can get you there safely.


  1. HAVE FUN - Ultimately, we run and participate in races to enjoy ourselves and a virtual experience is no different. I’m never the first one to cross the official finish line, but you better believe that I’ll be the first one to cross the streamer finish line held up by my husband and toddlers! Many years from now, we’ll look back at this pandemic time and "have all the feels" when it comes to thinking about quarantining, zoom meetings, and virtual learning. Let's make sure to have a bright spot when we think about our virtual race career. 

Written by Neely Gracey
Updated by Kristin Martin



Did you know that water does more than just keep you hydrated? Obviously, that is an important role, but water is essential in your body for three other important tasks.

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   1-Water helps transport nutrients to the working muscles during training

   2-Water eliminates waste products (like lactic acid) during high intensity training

   3-Water works to keep your core temperature cooler by dissipating heat through sweating

Hydration does not have to be from water alone. Here are some other ideas of delicious, refreshing, and hydrating summer drinks.

The ramifications of not having enough fluid in your system can start with just 2% fluid loss. Headache, lack of concentration, dizziness, fatigue, inability to recover, and overall decreased ability to perform. Nothing that helps your training or allows you to work hard towards your goals. To avoid any of these happening to you this summer, here are a few things to include in your daily routine.

   1-Drink 8-12 ounces of water when you first wake up to kick start hydration

   2-Drink more than just water. Adding in electrolyte beverages will help your cells saturate with fluid and not dilute your body’s natural salt chemistry

   3-Drink consistently throughout the day. Keep a water bottle with you at all times

Hold up your water bottle in a toast to quality summer training and good hydration!

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